Share/Bookmark

The "Denunciatory Ethic" Replaces American Exceptionalism: Part I

Jim Spence (left)
Whatever happened to the idea of American Exceptionalism? It has given way to an American phenomenon embraced by progressive Democrats known as the "Denunciatory Ethic."
Recall the absurd defenses in th media of the rants of Reverend Jeremiah Wright prior to the 2008 election. Recall watching outgoing President Calderon of Mexico bash Arizona while being interviewed on CNN by Wolf Blitzer a few years ago, See video of the Blitzer - Calderon interview here:
Jeremiah Wright
These two events and many others have been well explained by former Wall Street Journal editor Paul Craig Roberts a couple of decades ago. He offered a poignant explanation of the brand of philosophy known as the “Denunciatory Ethic.” According to Roberts, the United States has been influenced by this philosophy and has been steadily moving from an affirmative view of itself to a denunciatory view. Supposedly the nightmare experiences of Vietnam and Watergate played a role in accelerating this process. And not surprisingly, border secuity enforcement law in Arizona has provided a fresh impetus for its re-emergence in recent years.
Paul Craig Roberts
    According to Roberts the “Denunciatory Ethic,” prefers that Americans be generous in their views of the actions of non-Americans, but very critical towards itself. Eugene Rostow also described this mindset:
  “We tend to blame ourselves for everything that goes wrong in the world and to assume that other nations share our good intentions and will follow our good example. We take pride in self-flagellation, and seize every opportunity for excusing or ignoring the faults and short-comings of others.”
    Several questions arise. Is self-induced shame a useful tool for achieving change? Or would a bill to correct a perceived deficiency in the federal immigration law be better? Is national self-flagellation a blueprint for enlightened leadership? Is stressing the highlighting America’s past shortcomings rather than building on past achievements and successes right?
    In Texas there has been a bitter battle over text book composition for years. The Denunciation Ethic is at the center of this battle. On one side proponents interested in stressing America’s virtues want more balance. On the other side the denunciation ethic is preferred. Which approach will result in better education?
   No fair minded individual can deny that the U.S. government has made many policy mistakes since its inception. It is also true that America is the most charitable nation in human history. Is it a good idea for any nation, even America, to attempt to engage in a conscious effort to suppress recognition of its collective achievements?
Louis Farrakhan
    Two years ago Reverend Jeremiah Wright’s sermons tried to make the case for the denunciation ethic much as Louis Farrakhan has on many occasions (left). On videotape (watch here) from his pulpit, Rev. Wright offered many premises that he felt could enable him to blame “white” America for deaths caused by radical Islamic suicide bombers. Repeatedly denouncing America, (especially white America) was the common thread connecting the messages conveyed in that Chicago church.
    Strangely enough, when the nuances are stripped away, denouncers are found attempting to sanction the process of the U.S. engaging in a war with itself. There is an unmistakable pattern of duplicity in the way a denouncer evaluates churches. Greater fault is found with Pat Roberson’s pro-life church sermons than with Pastor Wright’s “Goddamn America,” curses. Read rest of the column here: News New Mexico

Share/Bookmark

Bernanke Gets a Free Pass on Capitol Hill

Ben Bernanke
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke told lawmakers on Capitol Hill today that progress in reducing unemployment is likely to be “frustratingly slow.” Not exactly music to the ears of the "forward" message of the Obama re-election efforts.
Bernanke said the Federal Open Market Committee is considering whether the economy will need additional stimulus to reduce an unemployment rate that has remained well above 8 percent since February of 2009. Bernanke suggested moves by the Fed to reduce the cost of borrowing by the Federal government have been “effective in easing financial conditions and promoting strength in the economy.”
However, Bernanke made no mention of how the Fed’s “large-scale asset purchases” have actually destroyed the interest income earning potential of millions of savers in the U.S. By forcing interest rates down to Depression Era levels or worse, the actual costs of the massive government deficits the last three years has been masked. None of the lawmakers challenged Bernanke today on the horrific damage done to savers who rely on interest income, as a result of government-friendly anti-saver policies.

Share/Bookmark

State Spending on "Public Art" a Matter of Law

KRQE - The difficult economy has resulted in state budget cuts at multiple levels over the last several years, but KRQE News 13 has discovered an area of state spending that appears to be flying under the radar.
The size of the state’s collection of publicly-funded art pieces continues to grow, even in tough economic times.
“We’re concerned about this kind of spending on what are undoubtedly luxuries,” said Paul Gessing, president of the Rio Grande Foundation, a conservative watchdog group. State spending on public art is protected by state law. Passed in 1986, the Art in Public Places Act states that 1 percent of every dollar spent on capital improvement projects goes to purchase public art.
Since the law went into effect, state dollars have paid for the purchases of about 3,000 art pieces. “It’s the law…You don’t have the discretion to spend it however you like,” said Veronica Gonzales, secretary of the state’s Cultural Affairs Department – the department doing the buying.
Invoices obtained by KRQE News 13 show the spending continued, even as state lawmakers struggled to address a budget shortfall estimated at more than $400 million during the 2011 legislative session.
Among the purchases made while lawmakers debated ways to save money, $20,500 went to an unnamed stainless-steel sculpture; $20,500 went to another sculpture called “Brick Face Hope” for the State Land Office; $16,000 went to a sculpture called “Fish Hook”; $8,800 went for a sculpture of two dogs; $8,400 paid for another sculpture called “Tribal Rug Series. Read full story here: News New Mexico

Share/Bookmark

NM securities agency probing fake financial audit

Businessweek  A New Mexico financial regulator is investigating possible violations of state securities laws by a fake New Mexico Finance Authority audit being distributed to investors. The probe by the state Securities Division was announced Monday at a meeting of the governing board of the Finance Authority, which disclosed last week that a fake 2011 audit had been created and was sent to investors and creditors. Authority officials have blamed a former controller, who left in June, for misrepresenting that financial statements had been audited by an outside firm. The Finance Authority issues bonds and provides low-cost financing to New Mexico governments for capital improvement projects. State Auditor Hector Balderas told the board that his office is investigating the fraudulent audit and will report any criminal violations to law enforcement agencies. Moody's Investors Service has said it's considering whether to downgrade the ratings of nearly $1.3 billion in outstanding bonds issued by the authority. The Securities Division is investigating whether there was fraud against investors, who may have made bought bonds based on false information that the authority's finances had been audited. Read More News New Mexico

Share/Bookmark

Share/Bookmark

Once Again Oil and Gas Provides Surplus Revenues for New Mexico State Government

KOB - Veteran New Mexico lawmakers are not exactly dancing jigs when they think about an estimated $250 million in additional revenues that the state now expects to collect in the fiscal year that just started on July 1.
That is because the new money will come mainly from higher oil prices, and lawmakers have seen those prices climb and plunge, often at the mercy of events clear on the other side of the world.
"You can't budget from year to year predicated on what may happen in that industry," said Rep. Tom Taylor, a Farmington Republican who serves as House Minority Leader. "All sorts of things affect those kinds of revenues. I think we should watch them closely. I think the plan is to get them into reserves, kind of keep them in that arena and that's what we need to do with them because we don't know what's going to happen next year." Read full story here: News New Mexico

Share/Bookmark

Stephen Lopez is New Chief of NMSU Police

KRWG - New Mexico State University has hired Stephen Lopez to be chief of the NMSU Police Department. Lopez is the former deputy chief of the department and has served as interim chief since Chief Jaime Chavez retired April 1. His first day as chief was July 5.
"It was my pleasure and honor to select Stephen for this prestigious position as Chief of the NMSU Police Department," said NMSU Senior Vice President for External Relations and Chief of Staff Ben Woods. "As a long-term employee and recent deputy chief, Stephen has been instrumental in creating the department we take so much pride in today.
Lopez began working for the NMSU Police Department as a student in 1987 and became an officer in 1988, following his graduation from NMSU with bachelor's degrees in criminal justice and art in psychology. He also has a master's in strategic planning for Critical Infrastructure from the University of Washington.
Lopez's lengthy career at NMSU was unintentional.
"When I first started out at the police department, my intent was to work for a few years until I was eligible to apply for the FBI. They had a minimum entry age of 23 and a half, and I wanted to get some experience before I reached that age," Lopez said. "In those years, I had an opportunity to work with a lot of people in the department and on campus, and found that working at the local level, you get to make a difference for people and you to get the meet the people you're making a difference for. That's something I really enjoy - to the extent that I never submitted an application to the FBI. I decided to make my career here." Read full story here: News New Mexico
Share/Bookmark

Noon: Obama Wants You to Use Less, Spend More

Marita Noon
Townhall - My hometown of San Bernardino is just the latest in a potentially growing list of cities to file for bankruptcy protection. There are numerous reasons why cities, counties, and states are facing such drastic measures. Some cite a drop in tax revenues due to the decline in housing values. Others, as in the case of Stockton, CA, legacy costs—meaning pensions. California’s Mammoth Lakes blames a debilitating court judgment. In San Bernardino’s case misconduct in the city council is alleged, and a criminal investigation is underway.
Having graduated from high school and attended college in San Bernardino, CA, my interest was piqued when I heard that it had become the third California city to file for bankruptcy. The mix of declining revenues and increasing costs are pinching government budgets nationwide, and many more bankruptcies are expected.
Obviously, as individual households and businesses have done, spending needs to be cut back in all possible areas. Cut a little here, cut a little there, and hopefully it will be enough to add up to real savings. Read full column here: News New Mexico
Share/Bookmark